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The Academia Waltz was Berke Breathed's first cartoon, published daily from 1978 to 1979 in The Daily Texan at The University of Texas at Austin, where he was a student. The strip focused primarily on college life, although it sometimes made references to big news stories of the time (such as the incident at Three Mile Island in 1979).

The Academia Waltz

Berkeley Breathed

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21,386 Subscribers

Alley Oop is the classic caveman comic strip revolving around the irrepressible Alley Oop, who travels from prehistoric Moo all the way to the 21st century in his friend Doc Wonmug's time machine.

Alley Oop

Jack and Carole Bender

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Andy and his wife, Flo, live out the epitome of functional dysfunction. From the pub to the bedroom, Andy’s misadventures paint an indelible portrait of an extremely British battle of the sexes. Join Andy and Flo as they bicker their way through life. Their banter can be hostile, caring, sarcastic and adorable: the perfect ingredients for a lasting marriage.

Andy Capp

Reg Smythe

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10,364 Subscribers

Loved as an American icon and respected as an adventurer, Annie’s voyages pit her against some of the comics pages’ most notorious criminals. Annie’s tireless pursuit of justice has reinvigorated this classic strip, giving it more action, intrigue and curls than ever before.

Annie

Jay Maeder and Alan Kupperberg

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167,530 Subscribers

Johnny Hart’s classic strip, B.C., puts a caveman twist on everything. From philosophical ants to punny bits of unconventional wisdom, you’ll see why this strip has been a favorite for so many years.

B.C.

Mastroianni and Hart

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Follow Johnny Hart’s classic strip, B.C., from its humble beginnings in 1958! Join the original five (B.C., Peter, Wiley, Clumsy and Thor) as they discover fire, befriend dinosaurs, try to figure out women and make a new friend, Curls.

Back to B.C.

Johnny Hart

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3,567 Subscribers

Take a seat and enjoy Big Nate from the beginning! Restarted here from the very first strip, Big Nate: First Class chronicles the humor and misadventures of 11-year-old Nate Wright — sixth-grade renaissance man, self-described genius, and the all-time record holder for most detentions in school history. Nate's inventive schemes and delusions of grandeur might make his classmates, teachers and family members roll their eyes, but they're a blast to read for fans of all ages.

Big Nate: First Class

Lincoln Peirce

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Living in an enchanted forest with surrealistic landscapes, the engaging characters of Broom Hilda happily have no connection with reality. Other comic characters are extensions or distortions of reality, but Broom Hilda deals in pure fantasy, making the strip bewitchingly unique. Here in the forest, the inhabitants maintain a standard of madness where total irrelevance is the only relevancy. The strip is simply a loony-bin where what’s said and done often makes no sense whatsoever, much to the joy of its millions of fans.

Broom Hilda

Russell Myers

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306,828 Subscribers

One of the most famous and popular comic strips of all time, Bill Watterson's Calvin and Hobbes has been a timeless worldwide favorite since its introduction in 1985. The beloved comic follows the richly imaginative adventures of 6-year-old Calvin and his trusty tiger, Hobbes. Whether you enjoyed it as a child while expanding your vocabulary, as an adult in the newspaper or if you are reacquainting yourself with these cultural icons, Calvin and Hobbes will continue to astound and delight you. Follow the official Calvin and Hobbes accounts on Facebook and Twitter to hear about publishing news, events and giveaways involving a boy, his pet tiger and their brilliant creator.

Calvin and Hobbes

Bill Watterson

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Newlyweds Cathy and Irving navigate the treacherous waters of couple-hood. From pampered pets to prying parents, they’ve got a lot to learn! Wedding or not, it’s still all about Cathy - she personifies the young career woman and her typical daily obstacles. Ice cream, panic attacks, stress and love are all in a day’s work. We read, we identify, we laugh. Who could ask for more?Cathy is the Everywoman. She deals with diets, self-esteem, in-laws, and letting her husband know that she is the boss. Everyone can identify with her shopping, bills, taxes, planning for the future and coping with her husband’s incessant computer golf games. Whether you are a newlywed, single, or have been married for decades, all will enjoy the daily predicaments of Cathy and Irving.

Cathy

Cathy Guisewite

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Richard Thompson's Cul de Sac is a light-hearted comic strip centered around Alice and her suburban life experiences on a cul-de-sac with her friends Beni and Dill, older brother Petey and her classmates at Blisshaven Academy pre-school.

Cul de Sac

Richard Thompson

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Artist Joe Staton and writer Mike Curtis co-author "Dick Tracy," the classic comic strip distributed by Tribune Media Services.Created by Chester Gould in 1931, "Dick Tracy" is one of America's most-enduring pop-cultural icons, noteworthy for its steadfast, chisel-jawed hero and the gruesome gallery of villains he and his fearless team of Crimestoppers must outwit to put behind bars. When longtime "Dick Tracy" artist and writer Dick Locher retired from the strip after 32 years of meritorious service, fans Staton and Curtis jumped at the chance to don the yellow fedora and trench coat. Staton has been drawing comic books for many years and has more than 1,000 credits under his belt. Curtis, who has been writing comics since 1986, is the only former law-enforcement officer to work on "Dick Tracy." Both creators are excited about the new--and dangerous--adventures they have in store for Dick Tracy and his Crimestoppers.

Dick Tracy

Joe Staton and Mike Curtis

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Bill Amend’s brilliant understanding of sibling rivalry and generational struggles comes to life in a blend of attitude, wit and a big dose of reality. FoxTrot Classics allows you the luxury of going back to the first frames of this iconic strip.

FoxTrot Classics

Bill Amend

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HERMAN®, the hilarious groundbreaking cartoon feature that appears in hundreds of newspapers worldwide, continues despite the sad passing of creator Jim Unger. Unger, who died in June 2012, left a legacy of more than 8,000 HERMAN comics and a large following that’s still going strong today. In order to keep the laughs coming, Unger passed the comedic torch to cartoonist David Waisglass and illustrator Roly Wood. Waisglass had been working closely with Unger on HERMAN since 1997, when Waisglass stopped work on his own syndicated comic, FARCUS®, to assist his mentor and manage HERMAN. Unger’s outrageous humor and distinct illustrative style was an industry, with millions of HERMAN book collections sold in more than 25 countries. Born in London, Unger floated from job to job — including soldier, policeman, office clerk and repo man — before realizing his phenomenal comedic and drawing talent. In 2010, Wood joined the team to help create new Sunday strips with Waisglass and Unger. Unger told friends and family that he'd never before met anyone who could draw HERMAN as well as, if not better, than himself! Unger loved the new material and began contributing more and more new gags until his death. Although Unger wanted to publicly credit his creative partners, Waisglass and Wood strongly believed that the focus should remain on the work and its originator. The positive response from fans, friends and the entire Unger family has been terrific, encouraging the creative duo to continue the work that Unger started. "Roly and I are deeply committed to honoring Jim's comic legacy and his original brand of cartoon humor," says Waisglass. "It was his greatest wish that HERMAN live on and continue to make us laugh." Universal Uclick distributes the best of Jim Unger's classic cartoons along with new HERMAN material.

Herman

Jim Unger

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There's nothing "li'l" about this satirical classic from Al Capp.

Li'l Abner

Al Capp

1,471 Subscribers

Here are the dreams of all children—worlds of fantasy, humor, terror, and grand adventure. Little Nemo in Slumberland was the greatest comic strip of its day, perhaps the greatest of all time, acclaimed the world over for it’s artistic majesty, unbounded imagination, and ground-breaking techniques that helped define a new art form. Sunday Press presents Winsor McCay’s masterpiece in all its glory, on the web for the first time ever, in sequence, starting with the very first page. Over 100 years later, these Sunday comic strips, which influenced generations of artists, are as fresh and glorious as ever! A BRIEF HISTORY Zenas Winsor McCay was born sometime between 1867 and 1870, most likely in Canada, though his earliest years are not well documented. He quickly gained fame, as his natural talent as an artist and draftsman saw him rise quickly from dime museum sign painter, to prolific newspaper artist and cartoonist, to pioneer animator, even a vaudeville quick-draw entertainer. He started his serious illustration work Cincinnati, where he created his first Sunday feature, Tales of the Jungle Imps (1903), while also drawing illustrations for the original Life magazine. He moved on to the New York Herald where he created a number of small cartoon features, and then Little Sammy Sneeze, Dream of the Rarebit Fiend, and his masterpiece, Little Nemo in Slumberland. Little Nemo drew character inspiration from McCay’s son Robert, architecture and design from the 1893 World’s Columbia Exposition in Chicago, and fantastical features from those found at the Coney Island Amusement park near his home in Brooklyn. But the brilliance of it all came from McCay himself, with his unsurpassed draftsmanship and boundless imagination that created a new language of comics, even anticipating aspects of modern cinema decades before appearing on the screen. There were three incarnations of Little Nemo, first at the Herald from 1905 to 1911, then at Hearst’s American from 1911 to 1914, and once again at the Herald from 1924 to 1927. Winsor McCay died in 1934, ending his career drawing marvelously detailed editorial cartoons. Looking at the images presented in this online feature, it is no surprise that he once stated, “I have never been so happy as when I was drawing Little Nemo in Slumberland.”

Little Nemo

Winsor McCay

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Nancy was created in the 1930s by Ernie Bushmiller. Since 1995, the strip has been drawn and written by Guy Gilchrist. Nancy is famed for its gentle humor and playful sight gags. Nancy remains a devoted friend to her pal Sluggo, her Aunt Fritzi, and many others. Her childlike innocence never wavers.

Nancy

Guy Gilchrist

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Set the flux capacitor for 1955 as we journey back in time to the Golden Age of Ernie Bushmiller’s Nancy! By this time, Bushmiller had been drawing Nancy for well over twenty years and had honed the strip’s formula for success to a fine edge. Put on your poodle skirt and your bobby sox and join Nancy, Sluggo and Aunt Fritzi on their daily journey through the hilarious (with an occasional side trip to the surreal)!

Nancy Classics

Ernie Bushmiller

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This is where it all started! From the Yellow Kid and the Katzenjammer Kids to Little Nemo and Little Jimmy, these are the origins of the American comic strip, created at a time when there were no set styles or formats, when artistic anarchy helped spawn a new medium. This series will present the earliest offerings—from 1895 to 1915—of the famous and lesser-known cartoonists who were there when comics were born—over 150 creations from more then 50 superb artists, most reproduced here for the first time in over 100 years. These early pages can be seen in all of their full, broadsheet-sized glory in the new book from Sunday Press: Society is Nix, Gleeful Anarchy at the Dawn of the American Comic Strip. Later entries will include examples from other Sunday Press volumes. Sunday Press Presents will feature more classic comic strips at GoComics. Coming soon: The Complete Little Nemo in Slumberland

Origins of the Sunday Comics

Peter Maresca

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In celebration of the 65th anniversary of Peanuts, we’re restarting this iconic comic strip from the very beginning. Follow along as we stroll down memory lane with Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Lucy, Linus and the whole gang as they retrace the adventures that began on newspaper funny pages in 1950. Those were the days!

Peanuts Begins

Charles Schulz

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1,512 Subscribers

In the 81+ years that Ernie Bushmiller's Nancy and her pals have been cavorting around the funny papers, there have been many surreal, bizarre, manic, unexplainable panels of fun! Every day, we will bring you one of those moments. If you are dazed, confused, and don't have any clue why and how you are being entertained … You are now a true Nancy fan. We of "Three Rocks" salute you! Brought to you by Guy Gilchrist and John Lotshaw.

Random Acts of Nancy

Guy Gilchrist and John Lotshaw

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11,189 Subscribers

From 2000 to 2003, Jerry Bittle, creator of Geech, drew this warm-hearted look at the lives of modern divorced mom Shirley and her eight-year-old son, Louis. GoComics is proud to present readers with a chance to view those classic strips.

Shirley and Son Classics

Jerry Bittle

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7,101 Subscribers

Stone Soup Classics takes you back to where it all began! Relive the heartwarming, hilarious and relatable family adventures of the Stone clan as we jump back in time and restart the comic strip from the very beginning.

Stone Soup Classics

Jan Eliot

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11,651 Subscribers

The legendary hero Tarzan enjoys the distinction of starring in the first adventure comic strip, the first continuity strip and the first strip to appeal to readers for multiple generations. Some of these storylines date back decades, but the ape man's adventures never get old.

Tarzan

Edgar Rice Burroughs

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265 Subscribers

Click here to read the latest The Upside Down World of Gustave Verbeek.

The Upside Down World of Gustave Verbeek

Gustave Verbeek

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In 1964 cartoonist Johnny Hart, creator of B.C., came up with an idea for a second comic strip while flipping through a deck of playing cards. He enlisted longtime friend and mentor, Brant Parker to help co-produce and illustrate the Wizard of Id. To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wizard, we have launched “Wizard of Id Classics” here on GoComics. Join us daily and follow the antics of Wiz, Blanche, Bung, Rodney, the King and all the other “ID-iots” from the very beginning! Read more about Brant Parker here!

Wizard of Id Classics

Parker and Hart