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Alley Oop is the classic caveman comic strip revolving around the irrepressible Alley Oop, who travels from prehistoric Moo all the way to the 21st century in his friend Doc Wonmug's time machine.

Alley Oop

Jack and Carole Bender

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Liberty Meadows is the very popular strip by Frank Cho. Featuring talking animals and dimwitted humans, Liberty Meadows is hilarious. While the humans worry about the development of the various animals, no one is having more fun than the animals themselves. Laugh with these animals as they have adventures, fantasies, and animal group therapy.

Liberty Meadows

Frank Cho

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Most children would be terrified by monsters under the bed, rogue cyborgs, destructive aliens and dicey nuclear experiments. But Lio is not your average kid. Mark Tatulli renders this pantomime strip in a pen-and-ink style that matches the strips' dark humor and imaginative spirit.

Lio

Mark Tatulli

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Here are the dreams of all children—worlds of fantasy, humor, terror, and grand adventure. Little Nemo in Slumberland was the greatest comic strip of its day, perhaps the greatest of all time, acclaimed the world over for it’s artistic majesty, unbounded imagination, and ground-breaking techniques that helped define a new art form. Sunday Press presents Winsor McCay’s masterpiece in all its glory, on the web for the first time ever, in sequence, starting with the very first page. Over 100 years later, these Sunday comic strips, which influenced generations of artists, are as fresh and glorious as ever! A BRIEF HISTORY Zenas Winsor McCay was born sometime between 1867 and 1870, most likely in Canada, though his earliest years are not well documented. He quickly gained fame, as his natural talent as an artist and draftsman saw him rise quickly from dime museum sign painter, to prolific newspaper artist and cartoonist, to pioneer animator, even a vaudeville quick-draw entertainer. He started his serious illustration work Cincinnati, where he created his first Sunday feature, Tales of the Jungle Imps (1903), while also drawing illustrations for the original Life magazine. He moved on to the New York Herald where he created a number of small cartoon features, and then Little Sammy Sneeze, Dream of the Rarebit Fiend, and his masterpiece, Little Nemo in Slumberland. Little Nemo drew character inspiration from McCay’s son Robert, architecture and design from the 1893 World’s Columbia Exposition in Chicago, and fantastical features from those found at the Coney Island Amusement park near his home in Brooklyn. But the brilliance of it all came from McCay himself, with his unsurpassed draftsmanship and boundless imagination that created a new language of comics, even anticipating aspects of modern cinema decades before appearing on the screen. There were three incarnations of Little Nemo, first at the Herald from 1905 to 1911, then at Hearst’s American from 1911 to 1914, and once again at the Herald from 1924 to 1927. Winsor McCay died in 1934, ending his career drawing marvelously detailed editorial cartoons. Looking at the images presented in this online feature, it is no surprise that he once stated, “I have never been so happy as when I was drawing Little Nemo in Slumberland.”

Little Nemo

Winsor McCay

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Phoebe and Her Unicorn is the story of a friendship between a little girl and a mythical creature. This strip brings a little bit of warmth magic into a world desperately in need of it. Dana Simpson's beautiful art and sharp humor are a delight.

Phoebe and Her Unicorn

Dana Simpson

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997 Subscribers

Tough Town chronicles the misadventures of Rudolph, a divorced reindeer working unhappily as a 4th grade teacher. His hobbies include gambling, smoking, drinking and serving as a terrible role model for his son. When heʼs not driving his principal crazy, or neglecting his underperforming students, heʼs hanging out with a bizarre group of aliens down at the local bar.

Tough Town

Bob Shannon

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The Wizard of Id has been enchanting audiences since 1964.

Wizard of Id

Parker and Hart

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In 1964 cartoonist Johnny Hart, creator of B.C., came up with an idea for a second comic strip while flipping through a deck of playing cards. He enlisted longtime friend and mentor, Brant Parker to help co-produce and illustrate the Wizard of Id. To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wizard, we have launched “Wizard of Id Classics” here on GoComics. Join us daily and follow the antics of Wiz, Blanche, Bung, Rodney, the King and all the other “ID-iots” from the very beginning! Read more about Brant Parker here!

Wizard of Id Classics

Parker and Hart

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