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Reply All Lite: for people too lazy busy to read a whole strip Reply All highlights those moments in today's information-overloaded environment when you forget your adult-self and toss the megaphone to your fifth-grade inner child. Its main character, Lizzie is a busy-single-woman-with-successful-career-in-the-big-city who has a lot of those moments. Cartoonist Donna A. Lewis, an attorney at Homeland Security, admits she "clearly needs an outlet for the stress of working in the nation’s capital." Lewis taught herself to draw in law school (where doodling was the only escape from reality) and to write punch lines in the courtroom (no disrespect to judges, attorneys, plaintiffs or defendants intended). Lewis comes from "an annoyingly funny family" that provides material faster than she can "translate it into a written product." Now, she says, "The years of listening to their absurd notions about the world are finally providing value to my life." Lewis states that no family members were harmed in the creation of this strip, and some names were left unchanged in order to incriminate those deserving of such.

Reply All Lite

Donna A. Lewis

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Rudy Park is the barista at the House of Java, where everybody not only knows your name but is all up in your grill. Rudy, a dot-com casualty whose paycheck never recovered, is addicted to high-tech gadgetry. While caffeine-fueled HoJ customers vie for the "Who Can Annoy Rudy the Most" crown, Rudy's boss-the always-do-well-but-ne'er-do-good owner of HoJ-always wins. Cartoonist Darrin Bell earned his degree in political science at the University of California, Berkeley. His award-winning cartoons have appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, Los Angeles Times, Oakland Tribune and on "60 Minutes." Although he took a break from editorial cartoons soon after 9/11, he began drawing them again for syndication in 2013. In the '90s, Bell partnered with writer Theron Heir and the two launched Rudy Park. Today, Bell both draws and writes the strip as well as the Candorville comic strip.

Rudy Park

Darrin Bell and Theron Heir

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Savage Chickens began on a rainy day in October 2004 when, after one too many migraines, Doug Savage scribbled two chickens on a sticky note. Thousands of comics later, Savage still draws every comic on a yellow sticky note, and his work covers an eclectic range of topics, including: work, psychology, arachnophobia, pop culture, cats, time travel, love, zombies, and more.

Savage Chickens

Doug Savage

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Whether they are arguing about The Perfesser’s bad writing or offering each other advice on the opposite sex, Shoe's treetop crew of characters maintains a comical, spirited banter.

Shoe

Gary Brookins and Susie MacNelly

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In the days immediately before the digital photography revolution, Bee works as a photo-finishing technician in a one-hour lab in lower Manhattan. To amuse herself, she duplicates—for her own collection—any titillating photographs that happen to pass through her hands. When pictures of a naked corpse are left for processing, Bee’s curiosity goes into high gear. "...Like a Nancy Drew mystery adapted by Brian de Palma...He's a great illustrator, and he tells a convoluted story with economy and flair..." —Nick Hornby, The New York Times “Weirdness abounds in Shutterbug Follies—a giddy, splendid weirdness that makes the book a page-turner…It sits comfortably on a shelf between Daniel Clowes’s Caricature and Kim Deitch’s Boulevard of Broken Dreams.” —Marc Weidenbaum, The Comics Journal ➜ Email Jason Little This comic updates Monday & Thursday

Shutterbug Follies

Jason Little

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Somewhere in this great nation is a top-secret government agency in charge of providing aid to America's nonhuman citizenry.  Perpetually overworked and underpaid, these dedicated civil servants soldier on with a dedication exceeded only by their respective passions for heavy rifles, stylish footwear, and good sturdy squeaky toys.  They're not our country's best nor our country's brightest, but to all the lost and lonely creations of misguided science wandering the wild places of this country, they are a beacon of minimum-wage hope.  This is their story.

Skin Horse

Shaenon K. Garrity and Jeffrey C. Wells

1,087 Subscribers

Amy Sturgess yearns for a conventional life: success in her career, some friends for a change, and if all goes well, maybe even a boyfriend. But she's hampered by anxiety, shaky self-esteem ... and the fact that she's a superhero.

Starling

Sage Stossel

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Cat lovers adore this strip! Nicole Hollander uses her strong cast of characters -- a fairy godmother, the Woman Who Does Everything More Beautifully Than You, demon dogs and malicious cats -- to discuss social issues. Sylvia provides advice on everything from feminism to fashion, making it a hit with female readers.

Sylvia

Nicole Hollander

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Jeff Millar and Bill Hinds have displayed a knack for finding the absurdity in big-time athletics and using it to turn sports fans into devoted readers - especially with the ever-popular "Sports Jerk of the Year" contest. Sports is Tank McNamara’s beat, his livelihood. A former professional football player who’s now a TV sportscaster, Tank McNamara reports on the breaking sports stories of the day: the hot players and angry coaches, the pending lawsuits and drawn-out strikes, the constant roar and ever-increasing hype that make organized sports one of the world’s most lucrative businesses.

Tank McNamara

Bill Hinds

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Working Daze follows the employees trapped at MacroMicroMedia. MMM is a wanna-be software giant, and it's staffed by geeks and clueless management types. VP Rita will try anything that might make a little money (though her ideas usually don't.) Underpaid Dana carries he place and keeps it running, while overpaid Ed sleeps all day. Roy and Kathy are made for each other, and everyman Jay never knows when to keep his opinions to himself. Writer/creator John Zakour is a humor/sci-fi writer, whose work includes the Zach Johnson detective novels. Artist Scott Roberts was a longtime contributor to Nickelodeon Magazine, and is the author of the fantasy novel The Troubling Stone. John and Scott met when they both worked on the Rugrats newspaper strip.

Working Daze

John Zakour and Scott Roberts

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In 1999, Charlos Gary began working for the Chicago Tribune as a graphic artist. His cartooning talent didn’t go unnoticed in the newsroom, and within two years, he created a single-panel strip called Working It Out, which ran weekly in the Tribune’s business section.

Working It Out

Charlos Gary

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Rancorous bosses, quirky workers, and an up-and-down stock market populate the world of 9 to 5. A cast of regular characters include J.B. Wells (the boss), Sims (office flunkey), and Ms. Forbes. While mainly a satire on business, the comic also pokes fun at technology, relationships, dogs and cats, and life in general. The cartoon is by Harley Schwadron, whose business cartoons have appeared in Playboy, Barrons, and many other top publications for many years.

9 to 5

Harley Schwadron

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