Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson for July 30, 2010

  1. Emerald
    margueritem  almost 12 years ago

    He should join forces with Lio.

     •  Reply
  2. Wolf3
    COWBOY7  almost 12 years ago

    You’ll need to be farther than that, Calvin!

    G’Morning, Marg, Mike and Grog!

     •  Reply
  3. But eo
    Rakkav  almost 12 years ago

    I dunno. Calvin and Lio either would be the best of friends or they’d kill each other; there’s just no telling.

    On the other hand, if they gained up on Moe, then Moe would be history.

     •  Reply
  4. Stewiebrian
    pouncingtiger  almost 12 years ago

    Calvin, if you want to contact the aliens, just play the five notes from Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Or go to Los Angeles (there you can find L.A.-ans).

     •  Reply
  5. Missing large
    Sylvannis  almost 12 years ago

    LOL. Calvin, that is seriously desperate.

     •  Reply
  6. 150606 petunias 003
    MontanaLady  almost 12 years ago

    There was a line in some ole comedy sketch in the 50’s……about a drive in movie….

    “come as you are but stay in your car”

     •  Reply
  7. Purposeinc wolf
    ladywolf17  almost 12 years ago

    Calvin, you’ll be grounded for months when they see this.

     •  Reply
  8. Missing large
    enfant_terrible  almost 12 years ago

    Oh no, single vignettes are not my favorites. Now I have to wait till tomorrow for more Calvin and Hobbes adventures.

    Good night everybody. It’s almost 1 am on the East Coast and I have to work all night. For those of you who write “good morning,” are you just waking up? (so you’re in Europe, I assume?)

     •  Reply
  9. 150606 petunias 003
    MontanaLady  almost 12 years ago

    enfant_terrible….we’re in the Mountain Daylight time zone.. and right now it’s about midnight…

    sooooooo…good morning!!

     •  Reply
  10. Missing large
    enfant_terrible  almost 12 years ago

    Oh, I see…it does make sense. Thanks @MontanaLady!

     •  Reply
  11. Veggie tales
    Yukoner  almost 12 years ago

    It’s 11:00 Thursday night here.

    You certainly will be half way to that galaxy after Dad puts his boot to you.

     •  Reply
  12. Woody with beer
    WoodEye  almost 12 years ago

    Calvin! That’s a lot of work when all you needed was an aluminum foil hat!

     •  Reply
  13. Missing large
    PetrusS  almost 12 years ago

    In a certain sense his parents must be proud that he did so much work in the garden. That will definitely not happen again

     •  Reply
  14. 1 5 2005 1
    shirttailslim  almost 12 years ago

    Is Spaceman Spiff about to appear?

     •  Reply
  15. Maine coon
    harrietbe  almost 12 years ago

    In Oregon it’s about 11:45 PM, so good morning (almost) to all.

    I’ll bet Bill Watterson was a very compliant, obedient kid, and all this mischief was suppressed. What a great way to release it.

     •  Reply
  16. Cnh
    moronbis  almost 12 years ago

    Can there be another Calvin watching from the skies?

     •  Reply
  17. Missing large
    hobbsfriend  almost 12 years ago

    i am in ohio & its 3:15 a.m …CALVIN YOU ARE IN SUCH DEEP DOO DOO. YOU NEED A PILLOW FOR YOUR HINNEY! BUT WE GOTTA LOVE YOU!

     •  Reply
  18. Missing large
    hobbsfriend  almost 12 years ago

    GOOD MORNING ALL!! HEHEHE

     •  Reply
  19. Th giraffe
    lazygrazer  almost 12 years ago

    ‘half way’ won’t be far enough, Calvin.

     •  Reply
  20. Avatar 4519
    Dino-1  almost 12 years ago

    It’s 4:00AM now on the east coast NY so it is morning but unless the sun comes up it’s still nighttime to me. I’ve gotten up for nighttime potty training and also to check on other family members that are home from work and getting ready for sleep. This reminds me of the time me and my cousins made a SOS sign out of logs on the beach at a camp their parents rented. We were bored teens and wanted some handsome helicopter guys to come rescue us!

     •  Reply
  21. Missing large
    Herocoder  almost 12 years ago

    Even if you are not .. am sure they are going to be sending you there for sure ..

     •  Reply
  22. Large tv test pattern  color
    Lyons Group, Inc.  almost 12 years ago

    Good Morning. It’s 5:33 am here in the east.

     •  Reply
  23. 162730 168432129864914 100000943847125 299504 4221808 n
    kpreethy  almost 12 years ago

    that’s wat i think………He should be friend with lio!!

     •  Reply
  24. Missing large
    Deepal  almost 12 years ago

    wel its late afternoon here in India .. almost 3.30 pm.. and im stuck in office with a lot of work :^)

    thanks calvin u make my day

     •  Reply
  25. Missing large
    Puddleglum2  almost 12 years ago

    LW18 LADYWOLF, Was that pun intentional? I usually use single or double quotation marks for a pun word or words because not everyone is pun-sensitive (or wants to be). The last time I asked someone a similar question, he/she didn’t answer.

     •  Reply
  26. Missing large
    Puddleglum2  almost 12 years ago

    You’ve also dug your grave, Calvin, so you’ll soon be on your way far beyond the next galaxy, …that is, if you’re going to the right place!

     •  Reply
  27. B3b2b771 4dd5 4067 bfef 5ade241cb8c2
    cdward  almost 12 years ago

    What would really add to his handiwork, however, would be if he planted flowers in those letters. Then, even after the parents thought they had covered it all up, the words would magically reappear.

     •  Reply
  28. Missing large
    Puddleglum2  almost 12 years ago

    cdward, That’s ‘blooming’ clever! …although Calvin’s parents probably would ‘nip it in the bud’. I doubt that they would ‘dig’ it.

     •  Reply
  29. Missing large
    Puddleglum2  almost 12 years ago

    Johanan Rakkav, I quite agree. Thank you for the clarification.

     •  Reply
  30. What has been seen t1
    lewisbower  almost 12 years ago

    Darned good penmanship with a spade.

     •  Reply
  31. Missing large
    Puddleglum2  almost 12 years ago

    TN-REDD, Since your comment was not impudent or impertinent, I think it deserves a response. It is my opinion that the BIG words add to the fun of the strip and the point I am trying to get across, and they enhance its PUNCH. Do I have to be a six-year-old to use big words, and if Calvin had lived the past fifteen years and grown to maturity, should he gradually have stopped using big words before he became an adult? There are hundreds of thousands of words in the English language. Most people use 10,000 to 25,000 of them. Some people say not to use a big word where a small one will do. That’s fine, but oftentimes big words have subtle nuances of meaning that explain, clarify, modify, quantify, etc. to make a statement more meaningful and comprehensible. If I’m not familiar, or familiar enough, with a word I see or hear, I look it up in a dictionary, sometimes more than one dictionary. Some people like my comments, and at least a few don’t. It seems that even billdi, in spite of his sarcasm, appreciates my efforts more than you do. That’s your prerogative. You have a right to your opinion. “To Each His Own” I tried to make this as short and pithy as I could, and still be thorough. Enjoy your day!

     •  Reply
  32. Grog poop
    GROG Premium Member almost 12 years ago

    Wishfull thinking, Calvin.

    Good Morning, Marg, Mike & ♠Lonewolf♠!

     •  Reply
  33. Cnh
    moronbis  almost 12 years ago

    Well Puddleglum2!!! Nothing against your comments but TN_REDD has a point for sure… simple and stupid is many a times better.. :)

     •  Reply
  34. Missing large
    jonathan.james  almost 12 years ago

    Puddleglum2 - I’m curious about your response. I love using an extensive vocabulary, but generally refrain from doing so lest those to whom I am speaking believe I’m “putting on airs”. My father had Bertrand Russel for a teacher of philosophy at UCLA, where one student did indeed make a show of using his rather extensive vocabulary. Russel stopped him once and pointed out that the fellow was less interested in learning than he was in demonstrating his superiority, that a truly intelligent person could use exactly the proper words without resorting to his repertoire of superior words. I don’t agree, entirely, but I personally believe that you have to take into account your public, and use a more “normal” vocabulary, generally, than a “superior” one, regardless of the possible nuances certain extensive vocabulary words can impart. When I was in college, they offered a class called “Basic English”, and the object was to use a very limited 100-word vocabulary to write extensive and complicated essays. It opens a whole new world, believe me.

    While I agree with your sentiments, I enjoy the little tricks of using the English language, and what Waterson does with them in his marvelous C&H strip. Enjoy …

     •  Reply
  35. Mona lisa
    comicsgeniusguy  almost 12 years ago

    I’m in Illinois at 7:30. Calvin, you dont need an alien ship, just go into Spiff mode.

     •  Reply
  36. Cutiger
    rentier  almost 12 years ago

    Only geniuses!

     •  Reply
  37. Picture 001
    rshive  almost 12 years ago

    That looks big enough to be visible from space. Nicely done,since there was no airborne vantage point.

     •  Reply
  38. Missing large
    simestache  almost 12 years ago

    If you really dig around, there’s a hole lot more dirt on Calvin than this simple display in the yard!

     •  Reply
  39. Missing large
    LeslieAnne  almost 12 years ago

    JameJo… I don’t hear superiority when people use big words, I hear well read. It’s actually a joke amongst my friends and me, because there are a few of us that enjoy vocabulary, and we use big words all the time. And especially when reading something like C&H where a good bit of the humor comes from “superior” vocabulary as you put it. Puddleglum… keep it up with your big words!!!!

     •  Reply
  40. But eo
    Rakkav  almost 12 years ago

    As long as we’re discussing the merits of the English language, I might as well point out the enormous redundancy of its vocabulary and the confusion that can cause even to native speakers.

    One reason I like Biblical Hebrew so much is that it has such a pithy vocabulary on the one hand and the ability to use it in contextual idioms and combinations of words to make yet more idioms on the other. I like playing with nuances of meaning as well as anyone, but there’s a reason why I don’t go through the dictionary gathering vocabulary in order to do so. My talent in that area does no good if I’m the only one who understands what I’m talking about.

     •  Reply
  41. Abe
    TN-REDD  almost 12 years ago

    Puddleglum2.. I thank you taking the time to post your comment. I too frequent a dictionary. This morning’s strip is good example. ” Vignette” However , yesterday I was simply stating that sometimes, again, sometimes It is easier to see the forrest (Your point) without so many trees (BIG Words)…That’s all , nothing more. enfant_terrible I agree with you A short discriptive literary sketch is not my favorite either. Still humorus. Gotta love mister Waterson.

     •  Reply
  42. Horsey
    fsrstarr  almost 12 years ago

    Since we are on the subject, I do enjoy the nuances of words, and the skillful use thereof.

     •  Reply
  43. Missing large
    oletimer  almost 12 years ago

    Judging from this mornings comments,it appears we have a lot of people that don’t know night from day

     •  Reply
  44. Grog poop
    GROG Premium Member almost 12 years ago

    Seems to me that too many people are judging others.

     •  Reply
  45. 5346ae65734b4d0e82350407ef0d8e00 250
    cleokaya  almost 12 years ago

    Maybe if you plant flowers in the letters mom won’t be quite so angry. Then again mowing would be a pain. Nope mom and dad are going to be…miffed.

     •  Reply
  46. Martian
    JohnRJ  almost 12 years ago

    Sounds like to me that both Calvin and Hobbes are perfect canidates to be SETI researchers.

     •  Reply
  47. Sia 2
    StarChic  almost 12 years ago

    Oh Calvin, how we are wanna follow your moves.

    Unrelated Note: Does Anyone know what book it is when Calvin, and Hobbes make stuff out of clay, and Hobbes wear’s a smock, and says smock a ton? Thanks.

     •  Reply
  48. 140
    Rockingwoman  almost 12 years ago

    Good letter formation for a 6 year old! I couldn’t do better and I’m….., well older.

     •  Reply
  49. Abe
    TN-REDD  almost 12 years ago

    exoticdoc2 Are you sure about that. Just last month NASA found something like 110 exoplanets with this new earth orbit telescope. Just look at JohnRJ’s picture beside his comment. There’s one right there. He came as he was !

     •  Reply
  50. Jar jar binkskl
    Tineli  almost 12 years ago

    Good evening everybody! (5:40p.m. in Germany)

    My garden looks similar - and I don’t know why. Well, it doesn’t form letters and words, it looks more like from a boar, but I’m sure, there are no boars in my village… Perhaps aliens wanted to get into contact with me???

     •  Reply
  51. 1937
    billdi Premium Member almost 12 years ago

    Two of George Orwell’s ‘golden rules’ of clear writing:

    never use a long word where a short one will do never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent
     •  Reply
  52. Old joe
    ratlum  almost 12 years ago

    If you dont get visitors you got a good start on next years garden.

     •  Reply
  53. Abe
    TN-REDD  almost 12 years ago

    billdi………nicely stated ….

     •  Reply
  54. Old joe
    ratlum  almost 12 years ago

    Long words are good for people with out a good education I guess. Must be why lawyers and bible students read the same books over and over to keep coming out with different meanings. Yes I know Im off base here ,some lawyers have enough smarts to stay out of jail and book out great fees

     •  Reply
  55. Last 9 11 rescue dog birthday party new york bretagne pronounced brittany owner and rescue partner denise corliss texas
    Dry and Dusty Premium Member almost 12 years ago

    Interesting to see where all the posters are from.

     •  Reply
  56. Horsey
    fsrstarr  almost 12 years ago

    Grog, you are right. My earlier comment has been edited accordingly. I still believe that it is not appropriate or polite for anyone here to challenge the vocabulary usage or composition of another. The variety and manner in which comments are made should be left up to each person with no fear of censor by others (profanity excluded). Variety being a spice of life, I do not wish to see anyone quoting ‘rules’ for anyone else. Even ‘golden rules’.

     •  Reply
  57. Bth baby puppies1111111111 1
    kab2rb  almost 12 years ago

    I’ll throw my hat in sorta but not on word comments makes me think I’m not that smart, it’s 11:07 am here in KS.

    Calvin you will always have a way with words and your fascination of aliens.

     •  Reply
  58. Missing large
    BengalKittlyLuvur98  almost 12 years ago

    Nice try Calvin. Get ready to run!

     •  Reply
  59. Missing large
    Puddleglum2  almost 12 years ago

    JAMEJO, According to Wikipedia, Bertrand Russell was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, atheist, socialist, pacifist, and social critic. Logician and atheist in the same sentence seem oxymoronic (with emphasis not on the oxy) to me, but I suppose Russell has his place, wherever that is. I agree that one should not “put on airs”, but the faultfinder and critic often see what isn’t there. In Russell’s case, he DOESN’T see “The God Who Is There” - Francis Schaeffer It appears that the main point where you and I don’t see I to I (eye to eye) is concerning my public. To me, my public, for the most part, are the ones who have affinity with, or are at least interested in my views, statements, and opinions. Based on today’s responses on this subject, LeslieAnne is a prime example of “my public”. BTW, Johanan Rakkav, I’m sure that you and LeslieAnne (I like that name) are not the only two people who understand and enjoy the use of BIG words. As I indicated earlier, big words are part of the fun, plays-on-words, etc. P.S. Bertrand Russell and I have at least one thing in common. I consider myself to be a history buff, although not a historian.

     •  Reply
  60. Th giraffe
    lazygrazer  almost 12 years ago

    Imagine how utterly boring it would be if we all expressed ourselves the exact same way. It would be like listening to a bagpipe playing the same note 24/7. Not much fun.

    I’m thankful not a one of you is lucky enough to sound like me. ;)

     •  Reply
  61. Smiley tongue
    Smiley Rmom  almost 12 years ago

    Bravo, grazer! Let’s enjoy (or at least ignore instead of criticizing) what and/or how others write.

     •  Reply
  62. Purposeinc wolf
    ladywolf17  almost 12 years ago

    Puddleglum2 I didn’t even know that I did a pun. I never really consider myself good in that category. :-)

     •  Reply
  63. Missing large
    khpage  almost 12 years ago

    Does this kid have a deathwish? First the car, and now this. Puddleglum - it’s long been my understanding that the English language has something on the order of three quarters of a million words in it. At least that’s the number, I think, in the humungeous new Oxford dictionary….

     •  Reply
  64. Missing large
    Puddleglum2  almost 12 years ago

    TN-REDD, I understood what you said yesterday, and I did not agree with you about “zap all the fun out of the strip and the point at which you are trying to get across. It loses its PUNCH.” I take the opposite view as I indicated earlier today. However, perhaps you have modified your position since yesterday, based on your comment earlier today.

    BTW JAMEJO, That 100-word vocabulary thing sounds fine and dandy for a one-time (or few times) essay. To talk or write that way on a regular basis would be excruciatingly tedious, tiring, boring, dull, “etcetera, etcetera, etcetera”.

     •  Reply
  65. Sofa mutt2
    mike.firesmith  almost 12 years ago

    **Good morning Marg! Good morning Fran and Kizzzy! Good Morning L’Wolf! Good Morning Grog!**

    Can you hear me Major Tom?

     •  Reply
  66. Im smiling
    angelsniper45  almost 12 years ago

    kinda weird considering the china incident last week

     •  Reply
  67. Mona lisa
    comicsgeniusguy  almost 12 years ago

    Star chic, I think it is “Homicidal Phsyco Jungle Cat” or “It’s a Magical World”

     •  Reply
  68. Missing large
    yyodderr  almost 12 years ago

    StarChic, its in “The Days Are Just Packed” book :)

     •  Reply
  69. Sia 2
    StarChic  almost 12 years ago

    Thanks guys! I’ll check them out right away! (I have all 3 at home)

     •  Reply
  70. Abe
    TN-REDD  almost 12 years ago

    Alrite.Ok Puddlegloom2 Look’s lik you can be putting words together more better than them who aint nevr heered as such . Shucks eye dint near about know folks could bend der mouths to make allem high falutin words an all.

     •  Reply
  71. Abe
    TN-REDD  almost 12 years ago

    Not at all trying to cause Ill feeling. I think each and everyone’s comments are special to whom writes it. That is what a comment is …Right? I never said you ( Puddleglum2)were in anyway harmful to people that read your comments. It is apprent that people do like them . I never said that anyone didn’t like them. So let’s move on ….nothing to see here… As you said “Each to his own” I couldn’t agree more….

     •  Reply
  72. Missing large
    avonsalis  almost 12 years ago

    Silly me. I read yesterday’s comic (and comments) before today’s, so just a few minutes ago I wrote my own endorsement of puddleglum’s vivid, precise and correct (with one glaring exception!) vocabulary under yesterday’s comments. Silly me!

    I agree with grazer that variety is the spice of life. Billdi, don’t forget that Orwell and Russell were equally literate Brits, but Orwell would naturally favor short simple words (wisely chosen) because he was a novelist trying to get a point across to the general public in its own terms, while Russell typically chose rare and specific words because he was a scholar writing for the academe or for those debating complex theories. I enjoy both writing styles. Wittgenstein and Hemingway used simple words; P.G. Wodehouse and E.B. White used a delightful mix.

     •  Reply
  73. B3b2b771 4dd5 4067 bfef 5ade241cb8c2
    cdward  almost 12 years ago

    Love the discussion of language usage. I enjoy a mix of the terse and precise with the flowing and lengthier. Just like all the puns that have been floating around GoComics, careful use of big words can make a comment much more interesting. That is, so long as it’s not pretentious.

    Johanan, biblical Hebrew does have one disadvantage: no vowels!

     •  Reply
  74. Missing large
    Suzywong  almost 12 years ago

    Oh dear Calvin you are not going to be able to sit down for quite a while. Good evening everyone from England at 2200 almost time for bed.

     •  Reply
  75. Missing large
    Suzywong  almost 12 years ago

    Oh dear Calvin you are not going to be able to sit down for quite a while. Good evening everyone from England at 2200, nearly time for bed.

     •  Reply
  76. Grim sm blue eyes
    Ooops! Premium Member almost 12 years ago

     •  Reply
  77. Yellow pig small
    bmonk  almost 12 years ago

    Is he going to use Mom’s car to make his escape??

     •  Reply
  78. Old joe
    ratlum  almost 12 years ago

    W.Rogers my hero

     •  Reply
  79. Skipper
    3hourtour Premium Member almost 12 years ago

    ..I wish I could make this much cash doing nothing..

     •  Reply
  80. But eo
    Rakkav  almost 12 years ago

    cdward, that’s a common misconception. Biblical Hebrew does too have vowels (in the Masoretic Text). In Modern Hebrew, Masoretic vowel-points are used in the Bible, prayer books, children’s texts and poetry, but almost nowhere else. They usually aren’t needed - by adults.

    What of Biblical and Medieval Hebrew, as well as Modern Hebrew, outside the Masoretic Text? Well, normally Hebrew and related Semitic languages are shorthands. They have consonants, semi-consonants and letters called matres lectionis (“mothers of reading”) which show the presence of vowels. These languages do have vowels, and they are pronounced, but they normally aren’t written out. The grammatical rules of the languages imply what vowels are used in what contexts.

    Yes, there can be problems with ambiguity for that reason, but no more so than the kind of ambiguity that exists (for different reasons) with the English words “read” and “lead”, for example. I find that my context-driven mind manages Hebrew’s strengths and weaknesses quite well.

    Interestingly, the one Hebrew word whose pronunciation has been the most debated is the one whose pronunciation can be the most easily proved IF one has full access to the grammatical and accentual rules involved and takes them into account. That word is the famous YHWH, which should be transliterated as Yehawweh.

     •  Reply
  81. Toilet4
    dave1960  almost 12 years ago

    Good Morning from Scotland where it is 8:13 am on Saturday

     •  Reply
  82. Missing large
    LeslieAnne  almost 12 years ago

    Puddleglum… Thanks for the compliment on my name… I like yours as well… From CS Lewis I assume??? A classic! :)

    I love the back and forth discussion! Whatever your opinion, it makes everyone look at the issue from someone else’s opinion and defend that which they believe and adhere to!!

    BTW TN-REDD… It’s really hard to “not cause ill feeling” when you say things like the comment you made in “country speak” for lack of a better way to put it. You are implying that people with poor grammar are stupid… and that is far from the truth.I know plenty of country people that speak that way yet are WAYYY smarter than a lot of people that use big words.

     •  Reply
  83. Missing large
    jonathan.james  almost 12 years ago

    I think Russel’s point was that some folks use their vocabulary as a pretentious move. He indeed had an extensive one himself, and used it adroitly, and with finesse. He was far from being an intellectual snob, though, and that was more his intent in addressing the issue in class.

    I didn’t mean to point any fingers here. I, too, am capable of and frequently use a fairly large vocabulary, but again I limit it to appropriate situations. When I write letters to the editor, I want people, generally, to understand what my point is. When I write an essay I expect that more scholarly types will be reading it, and when I want to make an extremely precise point, I use extremely precise language. Just ask my very tolerant wife.

    Keep writing any way you like; it doesn’t hurt.

     •  Reply
  84. Jellyfish
    Me_Again  over 11 years ago

    …And pray that there’s intelligent life somewhere up in space ‘cause there’s bugger-all down here on earth!

     •  Reply
  85. Large  red among us
    #hunter boy is a genius  about 1 year ago

    do you want to know what might be coininceadentle

     •  Reply
  86. Large  red among us
    #hunter boy is a genius  about 1 year ago

    the fact that i was born on this day

     •  Reply
Sign in to comment

More From Calvin and Hobbes