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Comics I Follow

Mike Lester

Mike Lester

Tom the Dancing Bug

Tom the Dancing Bug

By Ruben Bolling
Marshall Ramsey

Marshall Ramsey

Gary Markstein

Gary Markstein

Kevin Kallaugher

Kevin Kallaugher

By KAL
Clay Jones

Clay Jones

Joe Heller

Joe Heller

Phil Hands

Phil Hands

John Deering

John Deering

Tim Campbell

Tim Campbell

Steve Breen

Steve Breen

Gary Varvel

Gary Varvel

Dana Summers

Dana Summers

Michael Ramirez

Michael Ramirez

Henry Payne

Henry Payne

Adult Children

Adult Children

By Stephen Beals
Robert Ariail

Robert Ariail

Steve Kelley

Steve Kelley

Cornered

Cornered

By Mike Baldwin
The Duplex

The Duplex

By Glenn McCoy
Arlo and Janis

Arlo and Janis

By Jimmy Johnson
Scott Stantis

Scott Stantis

Steve Benson

Steve Benson

Pat Oliphant

Pat Oliphant

Matt Wuerker

Matt Wuerker

Stuart Carlson

Stuart Carlson

Ted Rall

Ted Rall

Mike Luckovich

Mike Luckovich

Signe Wilkinson

Signe Wilkinson

Jeff Danziger

Jeff Danziger

Peanuts

Peanuts

By Charles Schulz
Cul de Sac

Cul de Sac

By Richard Thompson
Luann

Luann

By Greg Evans
FoxTrot

FoxTrot

By Bill Amend
Stone Soup

Stone Soup

By Jan Eliot
Big Nate

Big Nate

By Lincoln Peirce
Pluggers

Pluggers

By Rick McKee
Agnes

Agnes

By Tony Cochran
Barkeater Lake

Barkeater Lake

By Corey Pandolph
Ben

Ben

By Daniel Shelton
Boomerangs

Boomerangs

By Jack Pullan
The Buckets

The Buckets

By Greg Cravens
Calvin and Hobbes

Calvin and Hobbes

By Bill Watterson
Candorville

Candorville

By Darrin Bell
Daddy's Home

Daddy's Home

By Tony Rubino and Gary Markstein
The Meaning of Lila

The Meaning of Lila

By John Forgetta and L.A. Rose
The Elderberries

The Elderberries

By Corey Pandolph and Phil Frank and Joe Troise
Family Tree

Family Tree

By Signe Wilkinson
Flo and Friends

Flo and Friends

By Jenny Campbell
Frazz

Frazz

By Jef Mallett
Free Range

Free Range

By Bill Whitehead
Geech

Geech

By Jerry Bittle
The Humble Stumble

The Humble Stumble

By Roy Schneider
The K Chronicles

The K Chronicles

By Keith Knight
La Cucaracha

La Cucaracha

By Lalo Alcaraz
Lola

Lola

By Todd Clark
Maintaining

Maintaining

By Nate Creekmore
The Middletons

The Middletons

By Ralph Dunagin and Dana Summers
Moderately Confused

Moderately Confused

By Jeff Stahler
On A Claire Day

On A Claire Day

By Carla Ventresca and Henry Beckett
The Other Coast

The Other Coast

By Adrian Raeside
Pickles

Pickles

By Brian Crane
Real Life Adventures

Real Life Adventures

By Gary Wise and Lance Aldrich
Shoe

Shoe

By Gary Brookins and Susie MacNelly
Jen Sorensen

Jen Sorensen

Zack Hill

Zack Hill

By John Deering and John Newcombe
Ziggy

Ziggy

By Tom Wilson & Tom II
Matt Davies

Matt Davies

Matt Bors

Matt Bors

Rob Rogers

Rob Rogers

Dilbert Classics

Dilbert Classics

By Scott Adams
Jeff Stahler

Jeff Stahler

Drew Sheneman

Drew Sheneman

Jack Ohman

Jack Ohman

Jim Morin

Jim Morin

Walt Handelsman

Walt Handelsman

Nick and Zuzu

Nick and Zuzu

By Nick Galifianakis
Nick Anderson

Nick Anderson

Andertoons

Andertoons

By Mark Anderson
Aunty Acid

Aunty Acid

By Ged Backland
Bo Nanas

Bo Nanas

By John Kovaleski
Lalo Alcaraz

Lalo Alcaraz

Joel Pett

Joel Pett

Cathy Classics

Cathy Classics

By Cathy Guisewite

Recent Comments

  1. about 7 hours ago on Jeff Danziger

    Both political parties are private organizations. They have no responsibility to represent the voters. They sponsor the candidate they prefer. To be upset about that fact is to misunderstand that the parties exist to push their agenda, and to support the candidates that they believe will further that agenda. If you agree with their agenda, then support them. If you don’t support their agenda, then that would be a dumb thing to do, because they don’t represent you, they never promised to do so, and they have no responsibility to you. And, it doesn’t make any more sense to allow them to determine your opinion of any candidate than it would if it were your local YMCA. For that, you need to actually do a little research ( try Open Secrets) and find out who does best represent your opinions. That’s where you should send your money.

  2. about 7 hours ago on Mike Luckovich

    Trump isn’t even the disease, he’s just a symptom. The disease is the capitalist system that produces a permanent underclass while assuring them that they are in a country that gives everyone equal opportunity. The media lets us know on a regular basis that there are people who were born in poverty but overcame the odds and are rich. That requires either talent, superior intelligence, or luck, frequently a combination of the three. And, the average person doesn’t have that advantage, or the advantage of being born on third base. So, the people who are still giving it their all and keep striking out have the general idea that the game is rigged against them, and no clear idea as to exactly why or how that happened. They get mad about it, don’t know who to blame, and Trump told them that it wasn’t their fault (probably the only true thing he ever said) and he wanted to fix it ( probably the biggest lie).

  3. about 7 hours ago on Michael Ramirez
    Most of the troll names we were used to disappeared after the midterms, probably to avoid having to explain a lot of premature gloating. I believe this is just one person, possibly two. I thought three for a while, but I have pretty much narrowed it down to just two. Some of the names are new and appeared when the familiar ones disappeared. They post something and then “like” it with the other names. The terminology, timing and general tenor of the posts remain the same as they were pre midterms.
  4. about 7 hours ago on John Deering

    Abraham Lincoln had never heard of an ICBM.

  5. 1 day ago on Mike Luckovich

    Republicans have to lie or they will cease to exist. In phone surveys, when people are given a choice on issues that affect their daily life, taken from both Republican and Democratic Party publications, those who identify themselves as Democrats agree with the Democrats about 80% of the time. Independents do to, about 58% of the time. The weird thing is that 42% of Republicans agree with the Democratic positions too, unless the are told which is which. Then they fall into line and agree with the Republicans 78% of the time. People who identify as Republicans make up somewhere between 30% and 42% of the voters, depending on the year. It’s currently way down. 78% of 42% is 33%. The Republicans would never win another national election with those odds. So, the Republicans have to keep as many people from voting as possible, and keep the rest of them confused enough to vote against their own best interests.

  6. 1 day ago on Robert Ariail

    I had a better fantasy, I actually believed in the ‘60s that people would gradually see that us vs them was illogical and the Age of Aquarius was dawning. I’m still waiting, but I’m a lot more cynical.

  7. 1 day ago on Mike Luckovich

    The Republicans are actually more organized than the Democrats. The Democrats have an established party platform, which at least two, usually more, of them ignore on several issues. The Republicans have no established platform because they can’t afford to let the general public know what they actually stand for. They would lose a lot of their voters if they actually understood what they were voting for. But, the ones elected to congress understand, or at least ( Hershal Walker is the best example, even unelected) are willing to very reliably vote as they are told in exchange for — well, I’m not sure of their motivation, but they do it.

  8. 1 day ago on Robert Ariail

    I have to admit, you do make me see the situation from the other side’s viewpoint. But, it is necessary for everyone to be treated equally, and if I was baking cakes for a living, yes, I would have to bake the KKK a cake. I even promise that when I throw up, I will try to avoid involving the cake batter.

  9. 2 days ago on Family Tree

    Yes, they actually do. However, I suspect that the degree does nothing to improve their ability at their job, other than impress their boss.

  10. 2 days ago on Family Tree
    There is no way of knowing what we have lost with our policy of not giving every person their best opportunity to achieve whatever they can. It is detrimental to the entire human race, not just to the individual. And, it isn’t just that the mind that could have discovered the cure for cancer could have been born in poverty and never learned to read.

    The average college graduate pays more in federal taxes very year of their working life than the average high school graduate. If that’s divided by the 4 years it takes to get a college education, and public schools were free, those additional taxes would pay for their schooling, with a net gain in total paid. The rest of us wouldn’t have to have a tax raise to pay for it, the same amount of money could be raised even with a tax cut.

    This doesn’t even consider that with the degree, the person is less likely to ever need unemployment or welfare, and that more students would complete high school if they could see it as the way to a good job. They would also be paying a larger amount in all other types of taxes, social security and Medicare.

    The best investment we could make to keep America strong is to not just forgive all student loans but to make all higher education, including trade schools, etc totally free, as long as the student is making decent grades. Yes, It’s good for them individually, but the country is made of individuals, so wants good for one is good for the country as a whole.