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Comics I Follow

Herb and Jamaal

Herb and Jamaal

By Stephen Bentley
Calvin and Hobbes

Calvin and Hobbes

By Bill Watterson
Jeff Danziger

Jeff Danziger

Jack Ohman

Jack Ohman

Pat Oliphant

Pat Oliphant

Tom Toles

Tom Toles

Lalo Alcaraz

Lalo Alcaraz

Ted Rall

Ted Rall

La Cucaracha

La Cucaracha

By Lalo Alcaraz
Gasoline Alley

Gasoline Alley

By Jim Scancarelli
Nick Anderson

Nick Anderson

Walt Handelsman

Walt Handelsman

Broom Hilda

Broom Hilda

By Russell Myers
Ginger Meggs

Ginger Meggs

By Jason Chatfield
Mutt & Jeff

Mutt & Jeff

By Bud Fisher
Steve Benson

Steve Benson

Matt Davies

Matt Davies

Mike Luckovich

Mike Luckovich

Gary Varvel

Gary Varvel

Dick Tracy

Dick Tracy

By Mike Curtis and Charles Ettinger
Domestic Abuse

Domestic Abuse

By Jeremy Lambros
Joel Pett

Joel Pett

The Norm Classics

The Norm Classics

By Michael Jantze
Pibgorn

Pibgorn

By Brooke McEldowney
Shoe

Shoe

By Gary Brookins and Susie MacNelly
Lisa Benson

Lisa Benson

Cul de Sac

Cul de Sac

By Richard Thompson
Clay Bennett

Clay Bennett

Steve Breen

Steve Breen

Michael Ramirez

Michael Ramirez

Scott Stantis

Scott Stantis

The Knight Life

The Knight Life

By Keith Knight
Non Sequitur

Non Sequitur

By Wiley Miller
Diamond Lil

Diamond Lil

By Brett Koth
The Doozies

The Doozies

By Tom Gammill
9 Chickweed Lane

9 Chickweed Lane

By Brooke McEldowney
The Born Loser

The Born Loser

By Art and Chip Sansom
The Dinette Set

The Dinette Set

By Julie Larson
The Grizzwells

The Grizzwells

By Bill Schorr
Arlo and Janis

Arlo and Janis

By Jimmy Johnson
Ballard Street

Ballard Street

By Jerry Van Amerongen
Betty

Betty

By Gary Delainey and Gerry Rasmussen
The City

The City

By John Backderf
B.C.

B.C.

By Mastroianni and Hart
Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

By T Lewis and Michael Fry
Peanuts

Peanuts

By Charles Schulz
Glasbergen Cartoons

Glasbergen Cartoons

By Randy Glasbergen
Perry Bible Fellowship

Perry Bible Fellowship

By Nicholas Gurewitch
Prickly City

Prickly City

By Scott Stantis
Heart of the City

Heart of the City

By Steenz
Jane's World

Jane's World

By Paige Braddock
Red and Rover

Red and Rover

By Brian Basset
Rip Haywire

Rip Haywire

By Dan Thompson
Rudy Park

Rudy Park

By Darrin Bell and Theron Heir
Mike du Jour

Mike du Jour

By Mike Lester
Understanding Chaos

Understanding Chaos

By Gustavo Rodriguez
Citizen Dog

Citizen Dog

By Mark O'Hare
Lio

Lio

By Mark Tatulli
Tank McNamara

Tank McNamara

By Bill Hinds
Jen Sorensen

Jen Sorensen

(th)ink

(th)ink

By Keith Knight
Kevin Kallaugher

Kevin Kallaugher

By KAL
Steve Kelley

Steve Kelley

Jim Morin

Jim Morin

Matt Wuerker

Matt Wuerker

Henry Payne

Henry Payne

Rob Rogers

Rob Rogers

Jeff Stahler

Jeff Stahler

Matt Bors

Matt Bors

Mike Lester

Mike Lester

Bob Gorrell

Bob Gorrell

Phil Hands

Phil Hands

Win, Lose, Drew

Win, Lose, Drew

By Drew Litton

Recent Comments

  1. over 10 years ago on Lalo Alcaraz

    GOP stands for Grandstanding Obstructionist Pachyderm.

  2. almost 11 years ago on Dick Tracy

    Dr. Ghote’s name is pronounced “fish”: “gh” as in enough; “o” as in women; and I forgot the rest……

  3. about 12 years ago on Mike Lester

    I love this one, Mike. How come your e-address doesn’t work any more? Write me and give me a new one so I can send you my favorite cartoon. Bob (R.C. Harvey)

  4. over 15 years ago on Dick Tracy

    Jim Brozman has been a published comic book artist since his days at Northern Illinois University where he earned his Bachelors of Fine Arts in Illustration. Before graduation, he published his first comic called “Pablo Picasso: Police Artist.”

    After graduation, Brozman established his reputation as a comic book artist when he worked on the Renegade Press comic book called “Strata,” a black-and-white comic with talking, sword-wielding otters, Lancelot and King Arthur. This series lasted two years until his next project at another Chicago-based comic book company, Now Comics.

    There, he drew full-color comics, including “Rust,” “The Terminator,” “Speed Racer,” “Racer-X,” “The Real Ghostbusters,” “Slimer” and “The Green Hornet.” Brozman has worked for many independent comic book companies from the 1980s through the 1990s.

    For the past decade, Brozman has worked on the retail side of the comic book industry managing stores for Graham Cracker Comics in the Chicagland area. He has also kept active drawing the occasional comic book story. His latest being a comic book Brozman created with the help of local color artist, Josh Warner, called “Naperville’s Finest,” which was a free comic book given away with The Naperville Sun and given out at the local high schools. “Naperville’s Finest” was co-created with local sports editors and depicted all the local high school mascots as superheroes battling their rival local mascots.

    Brozman’s latest endeavor as artist for the legendary comic strip, “Dick Tracy,” is his first venture with Tribune Media Services. Watch for new characters and old friends in our award-winning strip – “Dick Tracy” – every day on the comics page and in color every Sunday.

    The foregoing is from the TMS site; due to a malfunction of my machine, it would seem I wrote it, but I didn’t. What I’ve written follows: You may remember that in December, I circulated in my online magazine, Rants & Raves (www.RCHarvey.com)a rumor that Dick Locher was going to retire from the strip. Syndicate spokesmen denied it; ditto Dick, who phoned me to say he was staying on the job. But now we have a new signature joining Locher’s on the strip, a fairly clear indication that changes are coming. Locher may not retire from writing the strip, but he’s surely stepping back a little from drawing it all. My guess is that Brozman is inking Locher and embellishing a little as he goes along. How long Brozman has been doing this is a question best answered by Brozman; or Locher. I interviewed Dick for Cartoonist PROfiles in the mid-1990s and asked him then if he had an assistant and, if so, who. He said he had an assistant but that “the time isn’t right” for divulging who it is/was. Maybe now is the time. “Now” being the time that Locher is contemplating retirement more seriously.