Sea chapel

6turtle9 Free

Recent Comments

  1. about 12 hours ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    I know I would.

  2. about 16 hours ago on Frog Applause

    Promises, promises…

  3. about 16 hours ago on Cul de Sac

    Will it include the dreaded tube slide?

  4. about 16 hours ago on Scary Gary

    Gary’s driving a different car, and the plate says “VAMP 1.”

    Coffee, Tea or Travis? Go, travis, go!

    I wonder who Janet’s keeper is? Maybe it’s the Fifty Foot Woman. The last woman she caught Leopold with.

  5. about 16 hours ago on Scary Gary

    Don’t forget the jacuzzi bubbles.

  6. about 16 hours ago on Scary Gary

    Where there’s a will there’s a way.

  7. about 16 hours ago on Kliban

    Haha! Wait till they get to the head case!

  8. about 16 hours ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    Fill the hot tub with maple syrup.

  9. about 16 hours ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    And if she could, she wouldn’t wear much more…

  10. about 17 hours ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    Pancake Day, formerly known as Shrove Tuesday, is the day before the Christian practice of Ash Wednesday (the first day of Lent). In the Netherlands, even though two-thirds of the Dutch population have no registered religious faith, celebrating Pancake Day is apparently a beloved tradition (neither my husband or I was aware of it until this year). At least, that is the impression you get if you’re a disciple of Instagram, Facebook, andPinterest. Pieter Bruegel the Elder, a famous Dutch Renaissance artist, shared his interpretation of Pancake Day back in 1559 with his painting “The Fight Between Carnival and Lent”. If you rest your eyes towards the center front left, right behind the Prince of Carnival (a jolly man wearing bright red trousers and a blue shirt riding a beer barrel) is a solitary woman hunched down making pancakes (or waffles?). The painting depicts the internal humanstruggle between revelry and sobriety, of life and death, winter and spring. Serving pancakes the day before a sustained period of fasting and self-reflection intuitively makes sense. It’s soul food after all – a rich, decadent concoction of white flour, eggs, milk, and butter. It’s a fitting last hurrah before the Christian practice of forty days of penance, austerity, and abstinence (Sundays are spiritual “cheat days” in the modern Tradition.)