Rose is Rose by Don Wimmer and Pat Brady for September 25, 2023

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    Zeno2099  7 months ago

    Most of them are unfortunately very morbid, dystopian, and depressing nowadays, but there exist some friendly or at least positive ones as well.

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    jagedlo  7 months ago

    Didn’t know Rose was a comic book fan…

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    MS72  7 months ago

    Those days were sweet.

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    Robert Miller Premium Member 7 months ago

    I have a small collection of Spiderman from the 80’s…even the wedding covers! I also have a few Wolverine, Groo, and some Marvel 2099 Characters. I’ve told my kids they can have them when I die…

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    1953Baby  7 months ago

    I just tried to read “The Iliad” in graphic novel form. . . it’s still just a war story. . .and keeping track of the names and sides is . . . yeah, tink I’ll just read the Spark Notes, or maybe Cliff Notes. . .

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    DawnQuinn1  7 months ago

    Debbie Downer strikes again. lol

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    [Unnamed Reader - 14b4ce]  7 months ago

    Tell Peekaboo not to read Catwoman comics.She’s a bad influence

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    Anon4242  7 months ago

    Try Asterix the Gaul. Very clever and funny.I never get tired of them.

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    rshive  7 months ago

    And all of them at one point belonged to Pasquale.

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    Doug K  7 months ago

    To each his/her own – in their own way(s).

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    Teto85 Premium Member 7 months ago

    Asterix the Gaul, Usagi Yojimbo, Zippy, Komi Can’t Communicate, the Dirty Pair, Laid Back Camp, boxes of stuff going back to the early 1980s, mostly underground comix, and other stuff. All good times. Read at last one comic book today. EXCELSIOR!!!!!

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    LONNYMARQUEZ  7 months ago

    ranger Rory????

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    syzygy47  7 months ago

    My cat’s favourite napping bed is the newspaper I’m reading. I try to schedule him for the Sudoko page.

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    bwest.devore37  7 months ago

    a lot more expensive now. You used to be able to buy for 10,15 cents back in the day.

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    hagarthehorrible  7 months ago

    The comics owe to this family for keeping the genre alive.

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    raybarb44  7 months ago

    Or a cell phone with Go Comics .com…..

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    EnlilEnkiEa  7 months ago

    Comic books… great for all ages.

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    SrTechWriter  7 months ago

    The incomparable Walt Kelly’s POGO.

    I read it in the Washington Star, from the age of 5. Then found it available in paperback format. Still have my original paperback copy of POGO, copyright 1951. It has been read so many times that the spine and back covers are gone, and half the pages are loose. I still have them all, though.

    The I GO POGO sequel (1952) went had more than 7 printings and is the ‘story’ of Pogo’s candidacy for President. In 1953, Unca Walt got himself in dutch with the Gummit by lampooning Senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy, who took virulent offense at being ridiculed. That year, you couldn’t ‘swing a dead cat’ (in the words of the famed Samuel Clements) without hitting someone who had an opinion about Kelly, and whether he was a Communist or not. Kelly’s cartoons still are timely. Witness this commentary:

    “On May 1, 1953, Kelly introduced a friend of Mole’s: a wildcat named ‘Simple J. Malarkey’, an obvious caricature of Senator Joseph McCarthy. Considering the influence McCarthy wielded at the time and the possibility of scaring away subscribing newspapers, this was courageous. When The Providence Bulletin issued an ultimatum threatening to drop the strip, Kelly drew a bag over Malarkey’s head as Miss “Sis” Boombah (a Rhode Island Red hen) approached, exclaiming “no one from Providence should see me!” Malarkey appeared only more his face covered by his speech balloons as he stood on a soapbox shouting, to general disinterest.

    McCarthy was the most visible public face when the Cold War fueled fears of widespread communist subversion. He was known for alleging that communists and Soviet spies and sympathizers had infiltrated the United States. The smear tactics he used led him to be censured by the U.S. Senate. Today, the term "McCarthyism“ is used to mean demagogic, reckless, and unsubstantiated accusations, and public attacks on the character or patriotism of political opponents*.

    Trump McCarthyism
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    SrTechWriter  7 months ago

    The incomparable Walt Kelly’s POGO.

    I read it in the Washington Star, from the age of 5. Then found it available in paperback format. Still have my original paperback copy of POGO, copyright 1951. It has been read so many times that the spine and back covers are gone, and half the pages are loose. I still have them all, though.

    The I GO POGO sequel (1952) went had more than 7 printings and is the ‘story’ of Pogo’s candidacy for President. In 1953, Unca Walt got himself in dutch with the Gummit by lampooning Senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy, who took virulent offense at being ridiculed. That year, you couldn’t ‘swing a dead cat’ (in the words of the famed Samuel Clements) without hitting someone who had an opinion about Kelly, and whether he was a Communist or not. Kelly’s cartoons still are timely. Witness this commentary:

    “On May 1, 1953, Kelly introduced a friend of Mole’s: a wildcat named ‘Simple J. Malarkey’, an obvious caricature of Senator Joseph McCarthy. Considering the influence McCarthy wielded at the time and the possibility of scaring away subscribing newspapers, this was courageous. When The Providence Bulletin issued an ultimatum threatening to drop the strip, Kelly drew a bag over Malarkey’s head as Miss “Sis” Boombah (a Rhode Island Red hen) approached, exclaiming “no one from Providence should see me!” Malarkey appeared only more his face covered by his speech balloons as he stood on a soapbox shouting, to general disinterest.

    McCarthy was the visible public face when the Cold War fueled fears of communist subversion. He was famous for alleging that communists and Soviet spies and sympathizers had infiltrated the United States. The smear tactics he used led him to be censured by the U.S. Senate. Today, the term "McCarthyism“ is used to mean demagogic, reckless, and unsubstantiated accusations, and public attacks on the character or patriotism of political opponents^.

    ^ Trump McCarthyism

     •  Reply
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    MarshaOstroff  7 months ago

    Up into my teens, I was a big fan of all of the Superman comics, though by the time I was in high school I kept this interest to myself. When I retired in Mexico, I discovered several wonderful comics, aimed at adolescents and adults. Rius was a master at using this medium to make political and social commentary. I am especially fond of the La familia Burrón series, written by Gabriel Vargas. Best of all is the Mafalda series, the creation of the Argentinian master Quino.

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    [Unnamed Reader - 14b4ce]  7 months ago

    DC Comics just reprinted a 1941 DETECTIVE COMICS that includes the first appearance of the Penguin.64 pages—but it costs $6.95 and not the original 10 cents

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    Drbarb71 Premium Member 7 months ago

    Thank you Don and Pat for this cute comic!

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